gabriel-political-logo-full-name

Gabriel Enxuga has been a long-time community activist in Dartmouth and across Nova Scotia.28-cut

Originally from Antigonish, Gabriel moved to Halifax in 2010 to attend Dalhousie University.

For the past three years Gabriel has worked full-time as an anti-poverty community organizer with ACORN Nova Scotia. ACORN is a membership-based anti-poverty organization that unites low-income communities in the struggle for social and economic justice. Through Gabriel’s work he has spent countless hours knocking on doors and talking to low-income families about the issues they want to see changed in their communities – healthy and affordable housing, regulation of predatory payday loans, fair wages, and disability rights.

Gabriel has been a lifelong activist in the queer and trans community. He got involved with community organizing by starting a campaign to organize the first ever Gay-Straight Alliance (GSA) in the local high school in Antigonish in 2005. However, it would turn out to be a long struggle, and Gabriel’s high school would not have a GSA until 2012. When he moved to Halifax, Gabriel got involved with the local queer community. He sat on the board of the South House Sexual and Gender Resource Centre in 2010, served as the LGBTQ Students Representative at the Dalhousie Student Union, co-organized the first Dyke and Trans march in 2011, and also worked with the Nova Scotia Rainbow Action Project (NSRAP) to campaign for publicly coverage of transgender healthcare in 2014.

In 2013 Gabriel organized precarious and low-waged café workers for better working conditions through Baristas Rise Up (BRU) – a campaign of SEIU Local 2, Nova Scotia. Through direct workplace organizing, Gabriel helped organize successful union drives at both Just Us! Coffeehouse and Second Cup.

Gabriel is committed to working together for a better world.

Gabriel believes in organizing communities for change and he is running for city council to make the needs of low-income and marginalized peoples a priority at city hall.

Comments

comments